Abstract Realist

My initial experience with abstraction was mostly brick wall until I took a break to do some writing that drifted into nine months.  When I got back to painting, I got excited about a method I had developed for creating original compositions called Undirected Drawing (see Composition Method) represented in these paintings.  Artist Cary Jurians suggested the term, Abstract Realism, for the following work.  It is distinct from pure abstraction in that there are identifiable objects and scenes.

The Hill (oil)

Call this the town on the hill.  The homes in it reach beyond front porches to the ridges and ravines surrounding them.  This is the greater home, a texture of roofs  and streets and hills we have memorized by touch and sight and Sunday drives.

Parallel (oil)

Above and below, two parallel worlds on a single planet meet at water’s edge and share a common fate.

Homestead (oil)

A home and outbuilding; a horse and wagon; a fence; clouds of smoke from a chimney.

The Stag (oil)

A hunter and his dog at campfire encounter the white stag of legend.

The Well At Table Rock (oil)

This painting is about mystery.  The adobe house, partially hidden by trees, occupies a plateau strewn with round boulders.  I want to know who lives there.  And then maybe I don’t.

Centaur and Birds (gouache)

A centaur turns to see the bird shapes hovering about.  The blue structure in the background suggests classical architecture.